An insurance company provided liquor liability coverage to a restaurant/tavern including coverage for injuries "imposed" on the insured resulting from "selling, serving or furnishing of any alcoholic beverage".

The club was sued in an underlying state court action by the parent/guardians of three minor Plaintiffs who were purportedly injured as bystanders to a fight which broke out in the insured bar. As part of the state court lawsuit, the minors never presented evidence that showed their injuries resulted from "selling, serving or furnishing alcoholic beverages", nor were any allegations made that alcohol was a factor in the injuries sustained.

The insurance company filed a declaratory action in Federal court requesting the court to determine if the insurance policy covered the injuries in the state court action and required the insurance company to defend in the underlying lawsuit.

The Federal court ruled that since the injuries did not arise out of "selling, serving or furnishing of any alcoholic beverage", coverage did not exist, and, as such, there was no duty to defend the lawsuit. The court also noted that although there was an "assault and battery" endorsement in the insurance policy, the endorsement did not apply since the loss was not covered under the liquor liability policy. Mount Vernon Fire Ins. Co. v. Olmos, 808 F.Supp.2d 1305 (Okla. 2011).